Low blood pressure (Hypotension)
posted by Zakiah Akma December 01, 2015 0 comments

Assalamualaikum and Annyeonghaseyo!



Mesti korang pelik tengok aku post pasal bende ni kan? Haha. Aku memang ade low blood pressure ni kalau korang rase tertanya tanya . aku rase takde sapa kesah. haha. pity me.  Patutlah aku kerap rasa sejuk dekat tangan, rupa rupanya itu pun salah satu simptom (macam mana eja ni? lupa dah)  -.-'' So, tak nak buang masa, aku nak re-post balik definition low blood pressure ni.



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DEFINITION


Low blood pressure (hypotension) would seem to be something to strive for. However, for many people, low blood pressure can cause symptoms of dizziness and fainting. In severe cases, low blood pressure can be life-threatening.


Although blood pressure varies from person to person, a blood pressure reading of 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or less systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) or 60 mm Hg or less diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) is generally considered low blood pressure.


The causes of low blood pressure can range from dehydration to serious medical or surgical disorders. Low blood pressure is treatable, but it's important to find out what's causing your condition so that it can be properly treated.




SYMPTOMS


For some people, low blood pressure can signal an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as:




  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Fainting (syncope)
  • Lack of concentration
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Cold, clammy, pale skin
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Thirst



When to see a doctor


In many instances, low blood pressure isn't serious. If you have consistently low readings but feel fine, your doctor is likely to monitor you during routine exams.


Even occasional dizziness or lightheadedness may be a relatively minor problem — the result of mild dehydration from too much time in the sun or a hot tub, for example. In these situations, it's not a matter so much of how far, but of how quickly, your blood pressure drops.


Still, it's important to see your doctor if you experience any signs or symptoms of hypotension because they sometimes can point to more-serious problems. It can be helpful to keep a record of your symptoms, when they occur and what you were doing at the time.





CAUSES



Blood pressure is a measurement of the pressure in your arteries during the active and resting phases of each heartbeat. Here's what the numbers mean:

  • Systolic pressure. The first (top) number in a blood pressure reading, this is the amount of pressure your heart generates when pumping blood through your arteries to the rest of your body.
  • Diastolic pressure. The second (bottom) number in a blood pressure reading, this refers to the amount of pressure in your arteries when your heart is at rest between beats.


Current guidelines identify normal blood pressure as lower than 120/80 mm Hg.

Although you can get an accurate blood pressure reading at any given time, blood pressure isn't always the same. It can vary considerably in a short amount of time — sometimes from one heartbeat to the next, depending on body position, breathing rhythm, stress level, physical condition, medications you take, what you eat and drink, and even time of day. Blood pressure is usually lowest at night and rises sharply on waking.

Blood pressure: How low can you go?


What's considered low blood pressure for you may be normal for someone else. Most doctors consider chronically low blood pressure too low only if it causes noticeable symptoms.
Some experts define low blood pressure as readings lower than 90 mm Hg systolic or 60 mm Hg diastolic — you need to have only one number in the low range for your blood pressure to be considered lower than normal. In other words, if your systolic pressure is a perfect 115, but your diastolic pressure is 50, you're considered to have lower than normal pressure.
A sudden fall in blood pressure also can be dangerous. A change of just 20 mm Hg — a drop from 110 systolic to 90 mm Hg systolic, for example — can cause dizziness and fainting when the brain fails to receive an adequate supply of blood.
And big plunges, especially those caused by uncontrolled bleeding, severe infections or allergic reactions, can be life-threatening.
Athletes and people who exercise regularly tend to have lower blood pressure and a slower heart rate than do people who aren't as fit. So, in general, do nonsmokers and people who eat a healthy diet and maintain a normal weight.
But in some rare instances, low blood pressure can be a sign of serious, even life-threatening disorders.


Conditions that can cause low blood pressure


Some medical conditions can cause low blood pressure. These include:


  • Pregnancy. Because a woman's circulatory system expands rapidly during pregnancy, blood pressure is likely to drop. This is normal, and blood pressure usually returns to your pre-pregnancy level after you've given birth.
  • Heart problems. Some heart conditions that can lead to low blood pressure include extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), heart valve problems, heart attack and heart failure.

These conditions may cause low blood pressure because they prevent your body from being able to circulate enough blood.

  • Endocrine problems. Thyroid conditions — such as parathyroid disease — adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease), low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and, in some cases, diabetes can trigger low blood pressure.
  • Dehydration. When you become dehydrated, your body loses more water than it takes in. Even mild dehydration can cause weakness, dizziness and fatigue. Fever, vomiting, severe diarrhea, overuse of diuretics and strenuous exercise can all lead to dehydration.
  • Far more serious is hypovolemic shock, a life-threatening complication of dehydration. It occurs when low blood volume causes a sudden drop in blood pressure and a reduction in the amount of oxygen reaching your tissues. If untreated, severe hypovolemic shock can cause death within a few minutes or hours.
  • Blood loss. Losing a lot of blood from a major injury or internal bleeding reduces the amount of blood in your body, leading to a severe drop in blood pressure.
  • Severe infection (septicemia). Septicemia can happen when an infection in the body enters the bloodstream. This condition can lead to a life-threatening drop in blood pressure called septic shock.
  • Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). Anaphylaxis is a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Common triggers of anaphylaxis include foods, certain medications, insect venoms and latex. Anaphylaxis can cause breathing problems, hives, itching, a swollen throat and a drop in blood pressure.
  • Lack of nutrients in your diet. A lack of the vitamins B-12 and folate can cause a condition in which your body doesn't produce enough red blood cells (anemia), causing low blood pressure.


Banyak lagi info mengenai low blood pressure ni (tekanan darah rendah) cuma, banyak sangat nak kene post, hah apa kata jenguk kejap dekat sini..(kredit website tu sebab repost) Bace sampai habis ^^ haha. Tata! 





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